Fat Loss  Weight Loss - IPEDs

“Fat” Loss vs “Weight” Loss

Many people using IPEDs are looking to lose weight and there are a number of IPEDs that claim to help with this. There are also numerous diets that claim to help people lose weight rapidly.

But before you start using any of these; it is worth understanding the difference between weight loss and fat loss; as well as understanding how the body reduces weight overall.

When people talk about “losing weight” they usually mean reducing body fat; either for health reasons and/or to change their appearance. Many people will then start a reduced calorie diet for a set period of time. Many of these diets involve restricting calorie intake quite severely.

The problem with these diets is that they often restrict calories too much. This causes a rapid change in overall weight, but much of the weight lost is likely to be stored glycogen in the muscles and protein from muscle tissue. If you restrict calories too much, for too long, your body will hold on to body fat and use other energy sources when possible. This is a survival tactic. What happens then is, your body “shrinks” a little, but as soon as you stop the diet and start eating normally again – the weight goes back on.

In order to lose fat, specifically, you must first reduce the overall calorie intake by a sensible amount (no more than 20%). You must then look at what types of food you are eating. If most of your calories come from sugars and other carbohydrates, you will be unlikely to lose much fat. This does not mean a low carb diet is best.

Rather than “going on a diet” - it is better to just adjust the way you eat. If you want permanent changes to your body you must make permanent changes to your lifestyle, especially your diet. You are much more likely to achieve the results you want if you also include a balanced exercise programme that includes both cardio and strength training.

(See sections Diet and Training for more information)

Fat Loss Supplements/IPEDs

There are many IPEDs that claim to enhance fat loss. Most sports supplements shops and chemists sell supplements that claim to “burn fat”. All so-called “fat burners” are stimulant based. This means they work in similar ways to some illegal drugs such as amphetamines. This also means they can carry some of the same risks. They can leave you feeling jittery and tired, but unable to sleep or relax properly. When you take them for too long, you develop a tolerance to the effects and you need more to have the same effect. However, this means you also get more of the side-effects.

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Drug Description:

Clenbuterol hydrochloride is an anti-asthma medication that belongs to a broad group of drugs knows as sympathomimetics. These drugs affect that sympathetic nervous system in a wide number of ways, largely mediated by the distribution of adrenoceptors. There are actually nine different types of these receptors in the body, which are classified as either alpha or beta and further subcategorized by type number. Depending on the specific affinities of these agents for the various receptors, they can potentially be used in the treatment of conditions such as asthma, hypertension, cardiovascular shock, arrhythmias, migraine headaches and anaphylactic shock. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

Clenbuterol  is an extremely powerful drug and should be treated with caution.

Therapeutic use:

Clenbuterol hydrochloride has been available as a bronchodilator for decades and is widely used in many parts of the world. Although it has a good safety record and approval in a wide number of other countries, this compound has never been made available for human use in the United States. The fact that there are a number of similar effective asthma medications already approved by the FDA and available may have something to do with this, as a prospective drug firm would likely not find it a profitable enough product to warrant undergoing the expense of the new drug approval process. Regardless of this fact, foreign clenbuterol hydrochloride preparations are popular among U.S. bodybuilders and athletes, and today are widely available on the black market. Note that in recent years, clenbuterol overdose/poisoning has been reported in a number of people, striking up a great deal of controversy about the safety of this drug and its off-label use for physique-and performance-enhancing purposes.
(©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

How it is supplied:

Clenbuterol hydrochloride is most commonly supplied in oral tablets of 20mcg each. It is also supplied in oral syrups, injectable solutions, and for inhalation use. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

How it is used:

When used for the management of asthma, the most common clinical dose for adults is 20mcg (1 tablet) twice per day. Some patients require up to 40mcg (2 tablets) twice per day. When using the drug (off-label) for physique-or performance-enhancing purposes, bodybuilders and athletes generally tailor their dosage and cycling of this product based on personal sensitivity to its benefits and side effects. To accomplish this, one often begins a cycle by taking one or two tablets per day, and gradually increasing the dosage every third day by one half to 1 tablet until a desired dosage range is established. At peak therapy some users can tolerate as many as 6-8 tablets per day (120-160mcg). Given the potency and potential for serious side effects, however, any dosage outside of the normal therapeutic range should be approached with an even greater level of caution.
The drug will usually elevate the body temperature shortly after therapy is initiated. The rise in temperature is commonly .5 to 1 degree, sometimes a little more. This elevation is due to one's body burning excess energy (largely from fat), and is usually not uncomfortable. The number of consecutive days clenbuterol hydrochloride is now used is usually dependent on the response of the individual. To be clear, the athletic benefits of this drug will only last for a limited time and then diminish, largely due to beta-receptor down-regulation. By most accounts clenbuterol hydrochloride seems to work well for approximately 4 to 6 weeks. During this period, users generally monitor their body temperature on a regular basis. We are given some level of assurance that clenbuterol hydrochloride is working by the temperature elevation. Once the temperature drops back to normal, receptor down-regulation has probably diminished the efficacy of the drug. At this point increasing the dosage is usually not regarded as effective, and instead clenbuterol hydrochloride is discontinued for a period of no less than 4-6 weeks. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

Side Effects:

The possible side effects of clenbuterol hydrochloride include those of other CNS stimulants, and include such occurrences as shaky hands, insomnia, sweating, increased blood pressure, and nausea. These side effects will generally subside after a week or so of use, once the user becomes accustomed to the drug. Clenbuterol hydrochloride is a CNS stimulant with potential for fatal overdose. Signs of overdose may include rapid breathing, blood pressure irregularities, irregular heartbeat, unconsciousness, trembling, shaking, panic, extreme restlessness, and severe nausea, vomiting, or diarrhoea. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

Drug Description:

Ephedrine is a stimulant drug that belongs to the group of medicines known as sympathomimetics. Specifically, it is both an alpha and beta adrenergic agonist (you may remember clenbuterol is a selective beta-2 agonist). In addition, ephedrine enhances the release of norepinephrine, a strong endogenous alpha agonist. The action of this compound is notably similar to that of the body's primary adrenergic hormone epinephrine (adrenaline), which also exhibits action toward both alpha and beta receptors. When administered, ephedrine will notably increase the activity of the central nervous system, as well as have a stimulatory effect on other target cells. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

Ephedrine is often found in over the counter “fat burners”. It is a powerful stimulant and should be treated with caution.

Therapeutic use:

There is no current medical use for this drug.

How it is supplied:

Ephedrine can be found in many over the counter fat loss products, usually in small quantities. It is also available in a range of preparations on its own. Either as a powder or in capsules or tablets. Typically the tablets are between 25-50mg.

How it is used:

The primary application for ephedrine among bodybuilders and athletes (off-label) is that of a cutting (fat-loss) agent. Here, the individual will generally take this drug a few times per day during a dieting phase of training, at a dosage of 25 to 50 mg per application. The widely touted stack of ephedrine (25-50 mg), caffeine (200 mg), and aspirin (300 mg) (E/C/A) is shown to be extremely potent for fat loss, and is more commonly applied than ephedrine alone. In this combination, the ephedrine and caffeine both act as notable thermogenic stimulants. The added aspirin also helps to inhibit lipogenesis by blocking the incorporation of acetate into fatty acids. The athlete may use an increase in body temperature as a marker that the drug combination is working. This is usually a degree or so (not an uncomfortable raise). This combination is taken 2 to 3 times daily, for several consecutive weeks. It is discontinued once the user's body temperature drops back to normal, a clear sign these drugs are no longer working as desired. A break of at least 4-6 weeks is usually taken so that this stack may once again work at an optimal level. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

Side Effects:

Ephedrine can produce a number of unwelcome side effects that the user should be aware of. For starters, the stimulant effect can produce shaky hands, tremors, sweating, rapid heartbeat, dizziness, and feelings of inner unrest. Often these effects subside as the user becomes more accustomed to the effect of this drug, or perhaps the dosage is lowered. In general, those negatively impacted by caffeine would probably not like the stronger effects of ephedrine. The mental and physical state produced by this drug is also quite similar to that seen with clenbuterol, so those who find little discomfort with that treatment should (presumably) be fine with this item (and vice versa). While taking this drug one may also endure a notable loss of appetite, usually a welcome effect when dieting. Ephedrine is in fact a popular ingredient in combination (prescription) appetite suppressants. The user may further notice headaches and an increase in blood pressure with regular use of ephedrine. Those suffering from thyroid dysfunctions, high blood pressure, or cardiac irregularities should also not be taking this drug, as it will certainly not mix well with such conditions. Ephedrine is a CNS stimulant with potential for fatal overdose. Signs of overdose may include rapid breathing, blood pressure irregularities, irregular heartbeat, unconsciousness, trembling, shaking, panic, extreme restlessness, and severe nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

Drug Description:

Sibutramine hydrochloride is a selective serotonin and noradrenalin re-uptake inhibitor used for the medical management of obesity. This pharmaceutical is intended to be an adjunct to a reduced calorie diet, which will help increase weight loss compared to that achieved with modifying food intake alone. Sibutramine hydrochloride is not advertised as a rapid acting drug, but instead one that fosters slow, safe, and steady losses in fat mass which are maintained long-term.
Sibutramine hydrochloride exerts a weight-loss effect through two distinct mechanisms. It has a marked ability to suppress appetite. During some studies, patients would reduce their daily energy intake by as much as 1,300 calories while taking this drug.869 In addition to its effects on caloric intake, sibutramine also stimulates metabolism and daily caloric expenditure. A single 10 mg dose has been demonstrated to increase basal metabolic rate by up to 300/0, an effect that is maintained for at least six hours. This thermogenic action is known to occur via the adrenergic system, mainly through the indirect support of beta 3 receptor activation. With the use of this drug, we are specifically seeing a strong increase in brown adipose tissue thermogenesis (BAT), which is accompanied by body temperature increases of .5 -1 degree Celsius.8lo Elevated body temperature is a good indicator that thermogenesis is being triggered, which you may recall as one of the key things we are looking for when taking clenbuterol (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

Therapeutic use:

Whilst this drug is approved for use in the US as an obesity management drug, it is rarely used. In the UK it has been discontinued as highlighted here:
January 2010 discontinued in the UK: This medicine has been reviewed by the European Medicines Agency. The review suggests that there is an increased risk of non-fatal heart attacks and strokes with this medicine and this outweighs the benefits of weight loss achieved with this medicine. People who are currently taking Reductil are advised to make a routine appointment with their doctor to discuss alternative measures to lose weight. There are no health implications if people wish to stop taking this medicine before seeing their doctor.

Read more:
http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diet-and-nutrition/medicines/reductil.html#ixzz2htPQFjUb


How it is supplied:

Sibutramine hydrochloride is most commonly supplied in capsules of 5 mg, 10 mg, and 15 mg. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

How it is used:

The recommended starting dosage for most patients is 10 mg once daily, which is to be adjusted upwards to 15 mg after 4 weeks if weight loss has not been sufficiently initiated. Higher doses are usually not recommended. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

Side Effects:

The most common side effect with sibutramine is an increase in blood pressure, a trait that contraindicates its use in patents with high blood pressure or other cardiovascular issues. Other common side effects include dry mouth, sleeplessness, irritability, back pain, stomach upset, and constipation, all of which tend to become reduced in magnitude as the user becomes accustomed to the drug. Sibutramine hydrochloride should be discontinued immediately if any of the more serious side effects or symptoms of toxicity occur, including excitement, restlessness, loss of consciousness, confusion, agitation, weakness, shivering, clumsiness, rapid heartbeat, large pupils, vomiting, difficulty breathing, chest pains, swelling of feet, ankles or legs, fainting, disorientation, depression, high fever, eye pain, tremor, or excessive sweating. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

Drug Description:

DNP is one of the most controversial drugs in use by bodybuilders. This agent is not sold for human use anywhere in the world at this time, but is readily available as an industrial chemical. Among other things, it is used as an intermediary for the production of certain dyes, for photographic development, as a fungicide, in wood pressure-treatment to prevent rotting, and as an insecticide. It is technically classified as a poison. Although quite incongruous with this list of strong industrial/chemical uses, this chemical was sold during the era of patent medicine as a diet drug for humans. It is this property of dinitrophenol that remains of interest to some bodybuilders today.

Dinitrophenol induces weight loss by uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation, thereby markedly increasing the metabolic rate and body temperature . While this is an extremely effective way of producing rapid weight loss, there seems to be no ceiling to DNP's temperature increasing effect. Herein lies perhaps its most dangerous trait; it may allow body temperature to rise to level that can be damaging, even fatal. Writer Carl Malmberg made perhaps one of the earliest and most famous quotes about this danger back in the 1930s when he told of a physician who was "literally cooked to death" from using it. This was far from an isolated case, and deaths associated with DNP have continued over the decades. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

Therapeutic use:

There are no therapeutic uses for DNP.

How it is supplied:

DNP is not supplied in a form prepared for human or veterinary consumption. It is available as a research or industrial chemical only. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

How it is used:

DNP is not approved for use in humans. Prescribing guidelines are unavailable. A common dose used among bodybuilders is reportedly 2mg per kg of bodyweight per day. This calculates to a dosage of 200 mg per day for a person of approximately 220 pounds of bodyweight. Note that this population tends to retain more lean muscle mass than the average (sedentary) person of the same bodyweight, which may substantially alter the results and side effects of a given dosage. Admittedly, fat loss due to DNP use is highly rapid and extreme/ with some people losing as much as .5 to 1 pound of fat weight per day. This can equate to a drop of 15 or 20 pounds in only a few weeks. Given the high risks associated with DNP use, however, it is usually taken for only a few weeks at a time. The strong incidence of side effects is also regarded as an indicator that the drug should be discontinued immediately. Note that most experts regard DNP as a drug with inherent dangers that far outweigh its potential benefits.
(©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)

Side Effects:

There are many potential side effects associated with DNP use including increased heart rate, increased breathing rate, nausea, elevated body temperature, insomnia, profuse sweating, rash, skin lesions, decreased white blood cell count, cataracts, coma, and death. (©William Llewellyn, Taken from “Anabolics 2009”)